Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Cultural Chronology

Times change, and our ancestors lived among these changes.  It is often helpful to try and grasp an understanding of the time period that our ancestors existed.  This understanding will frequently break down a brick wall facing us.  Having Celtic origins, their times were of interest.  The Romans were the first to place on the pages of history the story of these Celts that lived on that island they called "Brittania".

Over the years I have tried to put together a "cultural chronology" that has following my own family along the branches of the old "family tree".  Readings, references, and resources I have called it.  Starting a blog on January 17, 2013, the items found most helpful are presented.  This blog can be found at tjg3rs.blogspot.com .   Each items has a brief summary and what topic it connects to my Celtic origins.  For example,
This reference contains some of the story surrounding my own family tree. "Babington's Plot" it has come to be called.   Interesting story it is, and my family was involved. [Edward Jones was his name.]  Many of my brick walls came down as this story unfolded.

From the Celtic world, by Green:

 to...the life of Henry VII...


 I have place these sources in a cultural chronology that has been helpful over the past 54 years of my own tree climbing.  I suspect there are those genealogist out there who face their on cultural chronologies with this same "Celtic" back ground.  Come follow the sources:

                                                                tjg3rs.blogspot.com

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

My Research Notebooks

Genealogy offers many ways to climb out the old family tree branches.  Now after some 55 years of climbing around my own family's tree branches, I thought it might be helpful to list how all these years of research have been collected and stored.  Very early, I began a single notebook which became my family tree as I knew it. [Started at age 9!]  This gradually expanded as my exploration became wider and more interesting to my mind.  Year after year, the number and quality of the work increased such that a collection of these notebooks began.   By 10 to 15 years into this tree climbing, I needed a way to organize and store the research.  Color coding was the way, by placing various dots on the notebook edges that matched the same subject or historical research.




Finally, by 250 notebooks, it became evident that I needed a way to find this research as the need was presented.  So, believe it or not, a blog was started on July 6, 2012 to code and summarize each notebook by its "number" and "subject matter".  The blog is:  tjgresearchnotebooks.blogspot.com.

You may check out this blog to identify my tree climbing research.  A way is available to search the blog using the "Search This Blog" line in the upper right of the blog page. Each numbered notebook has a central theme, and the content identified.  At present there are over 260 notebooks!  Feel free to climbing around a little yourself... no telling what you might find.


Wednesday, July 8, 2015

My Blogs From 2010

Today [July 8th] begins my fifth year of blogging.  Who would have guessed that on the 7th July 2010 this blogging adventure has expanded to 15 blogs!  I thought it might be of interest to list these blog in chronological order for those who might find some of them helpful.  The blog "address" is given following the date and title of each blog.

7 July 2010 - The Jones Genealogist : http://thejonesgenealogist.blogspot.com
   
           This blog tells the story of my beginning to this infection called genealogy. [Started at age 9]

30 July 2010 - The Jones Surname : http://thejonessurname.blogspot.com

            Telling the story of my own surname [shared by so many] is the goal of this blog.  Some 53
             years of research is organized into the posts.

8 August 2010 - GE-NE-AL-O-GY 101 : http://ge-ne-al-o-gy101.blogspot.com

              Using my own research methods, this blog describes how one might begin their own tree
              climbing.

22 August 2010 - GE-NE-AL-O-GY 201 :  http://ge-ne-al-o-gy201.blogspot.com

               Starting with 5 generations (ancestor defined here) the second stage of research.
               [This blog does not included the internet!]  How us old folks use to climb trees in the dark
               ages.]

4 September 2010 - GE-NE-AL-O-GY 301 : http:ge-ne-al-o-gy301.blogspot.com

               Time travel of course.

13 December 2010 - Welsh Genealogy :  http://welshgenealogy.blogspot.com

               Helping those of Welsh descent to get around in the world of genealogy is the purpose of this
               blog.  Welsh history and culture is included.

This is for the year 2010.  I will try and list the remaining blogs chronologically in the next few post.  Happy 5th Year Anniversary.

Monday, June 1, 2015

Sphere of Influence

Dynamic factors come into play during the historical periods that our ancestors lived.  These factors will influence the surroundings, and often direct the decisions that our family makes among the various branches of the family tree.  Many branches come to one of those "brick walls" when the twist and curves are a result of these factors.  Trying to get a grasp of these influences will help direct the tree climbing decisions.  One aspect I call "Sphere of Influence".  The following figures help demonstrate  how this concept may be approached.

The basic principle is that each family member comes under the influence of a dominate factor which plays an important role in their life.  A simple drawing [using graph paper] is shown.



 In the center is a square drawn to represent the "dynamic factor" that is central to the time period.  It may be an individual, or any issue that seems to play an important role for the family member.  There are four additional squares draw which are connected to this central issue.

Extending this central issue...


...various additional individuals [factors] extend outward in expanding directions.  Each being more distant from the center, yet still influence by the connection.  A cluster affect it might be called, or a "sphere of influence" surrounding the center.

Continuing the example...


... let's say the central dynamic is political.  For my family history much deals with the complex roll of the monarchy verses individual rights.  "Royal Power" is the center, and an "inter circle" is formed by those connected.  Family records will often list the names of various folks connected to this "sphere of influence", but making these connections become one brick wall after another.  An "outer circle" is formed surrounding these folks, and placing their role in this complex web, will often help connect family members.  Influence and authority extending from a central issue.  Making clusters and branches will focus many decisions among the family tree branches.


Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Concepts, Principles, Methods

Brick walls offer an opportunity to try all kinds of new things.  Over the years climbing trees [reaching 55 years!]  I have found various concepts and principles that have provided help in brick wall destruction.   This blog is an attempt to put these ideas into some form that may help other genealogist when they face their own brick walls.  Thus, it is called "The Brick Wall Protocol".

I would bet that there are lots of folks who have experience these brick walls, and have found ways to get around them.  It may be a method, or tool that has helped.  It may be a concept or principle.  This post is to ask those who have used [or discovered] these things to place a comment to this post. 

It may also be that there are those who are experiencing their own brick wall.  You might place a brief comment asking help from those who have been there before.

Please add your concepts, principles, or methods that have helped you get around those brick walls.

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Location, location, location...

Names can be difficult at times, especially those Welsh names to those of us on this side of the great pond. (USA)  Many times, these names were given as locations to certain family members.  An example is Howel of Ruth, Rys of Leeswood, and Peter of Bersham.  Add names like Llweeni, Hawarden, Selattyn, Hanmer, Ellesmere, Wem, and Llanfair Dyffan Clwyd.  Where and how are these connected?  Brick walls, brick walls, and more brick walls.  Finding the location of each place with the family member, would help answer many questions.  Such is the drawing given below.


Drawn to scale, the various locations that had been thought to be spread all over the globe, were actually all within a very short distance to one another.  All these folks were almost within spiting distance to one another, as my Welsh family proved to be.  As different folks spread about my pages of research, the ones from the same "location" would more likely be related.  Location, location, location as they say in some fields, but it can also help in getting around some of those brick walls.

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Drawing to Scale

Identifying the geographic location that our ancestors first arrived to this new land can often separate a number of brick walls.  It is helpful to draw maps that are "to scale".  By this I mean tracing a map out of a recognized source to scale. The following is an example of my own family search, where the name "Jones Point" occurs.


My ancestors arrived to stay in Virginia around 1650. [They were thrown out of England after Charles I lost his head.]  Rappahannock River was the major highway to their settlement.  Where this "Jones Point" was located was one task, as well as, trying to determine if these JONES families were connected to my own family tree.

As outline in the last post, landmarks are an important indicator of the families initial location.    Tracing a map from the "mouth" [opening/starting point] using an identifiable scale [mile markers drawn] can be used to carefully locate positions along the coast line.  Following the pathway along the shore line will give the location of other creeks, points, cliffs, etc., while providing a scale in which to mark the "mile markers" that often expressed in land patents.

It is important to recognize that one "shore line" does not always match the same distance on the opposite shore.  Each square above is draw as "mile markers" from the starting points [Stingray Point (south side) and Mosquito Point (north side) ]  Eight miles up river on the south side is only four miles on the north side.  The bends and curves of the river will also change their course moving "east to west" and then "north to south".  Drawing maps to scale will help sort out these descriptors on land patents.